Portuguese sardine pate (paté de sardinha)

Pate de sardinhaI’m keeping on a Portuguese theme this week, perhaps in an attempt to recapture holiday memories in these early days of autumn.

For me, Portugal is synonymous with sardines, an economical and delicious fish, and best served as fresh and as simply as possible. Although this Portuguese sardine pate recipe uses tinned sardines, it’s simplicity itself.

Paté de sardinha is ubiquitous in restaurants, arriving before a starter, alongside sourdough and salty grey-green olives. We always bulk buy it to bring home but it never lasts more a month in our house because it’s so popular, so making our own makes perfect sense.

This recipe is cheap, quick and easy, and is loaded with lots of healthy omega 3 fatty acids, as well as being high in calcium (if you buy the tinned sardine variety with bones left in) and protein. It’s good for breakfast, spread on toast which has first been rubbed with a clove of garlic and drizzled with olive oil, or for a picnic dip with crackers. Or try it in sandwiches for a speedy lunch.

4 servings

Ingredients

2 tins of Portuguese sardines in sunflower oil, 120g each, oil drained and reserved

1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed

2 tbsp tomato puree

2 tbsp of sunflower oil, reserved from the sardines

2 tbsp of olive oil

2 tbsp lemon juice

sea salt and chilli flakes to taste (I used a large pinch of each)

Method

Simply put all the ingredients in a jug and blend with a stick blender, or blend in a food processor.

Serve with toast or crackers.

Portuguese sardine pate

Advertisements

Taramasalata

 

TaramasalataEver since I discovered Hugh-Fearnley Whittingstall’s tarama recipe in his comprehensive Fish book, I have been creating permutations of it. This is the adapted latest but by no means final resulting recipe, using much less oil than his recipe but still equally moreish.

White sourdough is the best bread to use here, both as an ingredient and to serve with the dip. Alternatively, use good quality bread with some texture, such as ciabatta, or scoop it up with warmed flatbread or pitta.

Apparently it’s traditional in Greece to eat taramasalata on the first day of Lent, or Shrove Monday, which is why I’m publishing this today!

Ingredients

200g smoked cod’s roe

1 garlic clove, crushed

75g day-old white bread, crusts removed

140 ml milk

25ml olive oil

25ml sunflower oil

1 tbsp lemon juice

Chopped flat-leaf parsley and paprika to serve

Serves 4

Smoked cod's roeMethod

Break the bread up and soak it in milk for a few minutes. Scrape the roe from the skin, add the garlic and mix with a fork.

Squeeze the excess milk from the bread and mash thoroughly with the roe using a fork until you get an evenly coloured mixture (I prefer doing this by hand rather than a food processor as it results in a better texture).

Add the oil and lemon juice. Sprinkle with the parsley and paprika and add an extra drizzle of olive oil.

Taramasalata